Quick Answer: Who Were The Scabs In The Miners Strike?

What were the miners striking against?

The miners’ strike of 1984-85 was a major industrial action to shut down the British coal industry in an attempt to prevent colliery closures.

It was led by Arthur Scargill of the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) against the National Coal Board (NCB), a government agency..

Who was in power in 1972?

Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, MBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005), often known as Ted Heath, was a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and Leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975.

Why did coal mining decline in the UK?

Reasons for the Decline in the UK Coal industry. … From the 1960s, the UK discovered cheaper sources of energy, such as north sea gas and oil. Also the nuclear power industry provided a new source of energy. With new energy sources, we became less dependent on coal.

Why was there a bread shortage in the 70s?

Strikes were common place in the 1970s. And in December 1974, the nation’s bakers decided to put down their oven gloves and stop producing the daily loaf. So supplies were short and queues formed in Hinckley as shoppers queued for the eventual arrival of a few loaves.

How many mines did Thatcher close?

In early 1984, the Conservative government of Margaret Thatcher announced plans to close 20 coal pits which led to the year-long miners’ strike which ended in March 1985.

What caused the 3 day week in the 70s?

The Three-Day Week was one of several measures introduced in the United Kingdom by the Conservative government at the time to conserve electricity, the generation of which was severely restricted owing to the effects of the 1973–74 oil crisis on transportation and inflation.

How long did the miners strike last for?

The strike began on 13 October 1969 and lasted for roughly two weeks, with some pits returning to work before others. The NCB lost £15 million and 2.5 million tonnes of coal as a result of the strike.

Is scab a slur?

The term “scab” is a highly derogatory and “fighting word” most frequently used to refer to people who continue to work when trade unionists go on strike action.

What does a scab mean?

A scab is your body’s protective response to a cut, scrape, bite, or other skin injury. Special blood cells called platelets form a clot at the injury. These cells act like a bandage to stop bleeding and keep out germs and debris. As the clot dries, it forms a scab.

Who went on strike in the 1970s?

Coal miners officially went on strike for the first time in almost half a century in 1972; after two months the strike was settled with the miners getting a 21 per cent increase, less than half of what they had originally sought. Heath as a result turned to an incomes policy; inflation continued to worsen.

Why do unions hate scabs?

He didn’t, but the passage is often cited by union activists to express their opinion of replacement workers and picket-line crossers. The word scab suggests something unsightly and diseased. That’s the point. … In 18th Century England, laborers used it to denounce their peers who were unwilling to join a strike.

Are there any coal mines left in the UK?

This statistic shows the number of deep and opencast coal mines in the United Kingdom (UK) which were open and producing coal from 2000 to 2019. The number of deep coal mines has been steadily falling from 33 in 2000, while the number of opencast sites, which remain more common, has varied a lot more.

Who was in power during the miners strike?

The government announced on 6 March 1984 its intention to close 20 coal mines, revealing as well the plan in the long-term to close over 70 pits. Scargill led the union in the 1984–1985 miners’ strike.

Why did the miners strike in 1972?

The strike occurred after wage negotiations between the NUM and the National Coal Board of the United Kingdom had broken down. It was the first time since 1926 that British miners had officially gone on strike (although there had been unofficial strikes, as recently as 1969). The dispute was caused by the issue of pay.

What were flying pickets in the miners strike?

It is primarily used when only one workplace is being picketed or for a symbolically or practically important workplace. Due to the numbers involved, a mass picket may turn into a potentially unlawful blockade. … The first recorded use of flying pickets was during the 1969 miners’ strike in Britain.

How much coal is left in the UK?

The UK has identified hard coal resources of 3 910 million tonnes, although total resources could be as large as 187 billion tonnes. There are 33 million tonnes of economically recoverable reserves available at operational and permitted mines, plus a further 344 million tonnes at mines in planning.

What is the 3 day of the week?

WednesdayWednesday is the day third of the week according to the international standard ISO 8601, but some countries count it as the fourth day of the week. Norse god Odin kept ravens. Wednesday is the day between Tuesday and Thursday.

When did Britain have a blackout?

The 2003 London blackout was a serious power outage that occurred in parts of southern London and north-west Kent on 28 August 2003. It was the largest blackout in South East England since the Great Storm of 1987, affecting an estimated 500,000 people. Power went off at about 18:26 British Summer Time.

Why are strikebreakers called scabs?

By the late 1700s, laborers adopted the insult to refer to workmen who wouldn’t join a strike, a union, or take part in organized labor. … Just as a scab is a physical lesion, the strikebreaking scab disfigures the social body of labor—both the solidarity of workers and the dignity of work.

Why is it bad to cross a picket line?

That’s why it’s important to talk about picket line etiquette, and why it’s so important to never cross a picket line. The problem with crossing a picket line, whether you’re a coworker or simply a bystander in the strike, is that you undermine the work of everyone who is fighting for change.

When was the winter of discontent?

1978Winter of Discontent/Start dates